Sunday, December 26, 2010

Jesus Christ the Apple Tree"





Sung most often as a Christmas carol but wonderful for any time of the year. The The hymn is composed by Elizabeth Poston and sung here by the Choir of Kings College, Cambridge (1993) ...Here are the words



Jesus Christ the Apple Tree



The tree of life my soul hath seen
Laden with fruit and always green
The tree of life my soul hath seen
Laden with fruit and always green
The trees of nature fruitless be
Compared with Christ the apple tree


His beauty doth all things excel
By faith I know but ne'er can tell
His beauty doth all things excel
By faith I know but ne'er can tell
The glory which I now can see
In Jesus Christ the apple tree.


For happiness I long have sought
And pleasure dearly I have bought
For happiness I long have sought
And pleasure dearly I have bought
I missed of all but now I see
'Tis found in Christ the apple tree.


I'm weary with my former toil
Here I will sit and rest a while
I'm weary with my former toil
Here I will sit and rest a while
Under the shadow I will be
Of Jesus Christ the apple tree.


This fruit does make my soul to thrive
It keeps my dying faith alive
This fruit does make my soul to thrive
It keeps my dying faith alive
Which makes my soul in haste to be
With Jesus Christ the apple tree.

Monday, December 20, 2010

You are Warmly Invited

 To St. James Santee  Episcopal Church for the 2010 Christmas Eve service.  Friday Evening, 6:00 pm - Holy Communion, Rt. II, Carols, Violin, Organ, Homily and Children's offering - "The Stars of Bethlehem"

The Christmas Story

told in a slightly different way!


Friday, November 26, 2010

Monday, November 22, 2010

Christ the King



The Sands of Time Are Sinking
words by Ann Cousin, based on letters of Samuel Rutherford.




1. The sands of time are sinking,
The dawn of heaven breaks;
The summer morn I’ve sighed for -
The fair, sweet morn awakes:
Dark, dark had been the midnight
But dayspring is at hand,
And glory, glory dwelleth
In Emmanuel’s land.



2. The king there in His beauty,
Without a veil is seen:
It were a well-spent journey,
Though seven deaths lay between:
The Lamb with His fair army,
Doth on Mount Zion stand,
And glory, glory dwelleth
In Emmanuel’s land



3. O Christ, He is the fountain,
The deep, sweet well of love!
The streams on earth I’ve tasted
More deep I’ll drink above:
There to an ocean fullness
His mercy doth expand,
And glory, glory dwelleth
In Emmanuel’s land.


4. The bride eyes not her garment,
But her dear Bridegroom’s face;
I will not gaze at glory
But on my King of grace.
Not at the crown He giveth
But on His pierced hand;
The Lamb is all the glory
Of Emmanuel’s land.


5. O I am my Beloved’s
And my Beloved is mine!
He brings a poor vile sinner
Into His house of wine
I stand upon His merit -
I know no other stand,
Not e’en where glory dwelleth
In Emmanuel’s land.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

For Your Calendar, Pt. II

The Concert was glorious...please be sure to join us for....



A Talk by Suzy McCall, Long Term Missionary to Honduras and Founder of the LAMB Institute....

Thursday Evening, Oct. 21st, at 6:30 pm - Talk and Covered Dish
St. James Santee is proud to be a mission partner with LAMB Institute...Here is a little bit about their ministry..

LAMB is a Christ-centered, multifaceted ministry based in Tegucigalpa, Honduras which seeks to reach out to the world with the love of Jesus. LAMB was founded in 1999 by long term missionary, Suzy McCall as a training school for Hondurans called to world mission. Today, LAMB also operates an elementary school with over 250 children, a large youth outreach ministry, and a community assistance program which ministers to the needy with food, medical care, construction help, microfinance assistance. These three ministries are centered in one of the most violent and poverty stricken areas of Tegucigalpa – Flor de Campo. LAMB also operates a residential home and school for over 60 abused and neglected children in a rural setting outside the city. LAMB’s newest ministry is an outreach and shelter for girls and young women who have been victims of human trafficking.

Please bring a dish, a friend and join us. You will be inspired! For more about LAMB, check out their website at The LAMB Institute

Sunday, September 5, 2010

For your Calendar.....


A Concert - Sept. 19th,

4:00 pm *  Chapel of Ease



Songs of Praise and Thanksgiving. Organ, Cello, and Voices.

Featuring: Handel, Bach, contemporary hymn arrangements and spirituals.  Musicians: Mindy Burgin- Cello - St. James’ Church Musician; Elsie Pollack - Organ, Organist at Holy Cross-Faith Memorial Episcopal Church at Pawley’s Island; Patti Edwards, Soprano, and Brink Norton, Tenor.   Free!

Please join us and bring a friend.

And

A Talk by Suzy McCall, Long Term Missionary to Honduras and Founder of the
 LAMB Institute....

Thursday Evening, Oct. 21st, at 6:30 pm   - Talk and Covered Dish

St. James Santee is proud to be a mission partner with LAMB Institute...Here is a little bit about their ministry..

LAMB is a Christ-centered, multifaceted ministry based in Tegucigalpa, Honduras which seeks to reach out to the world with the love of Jesus. LAMB was founded in 1999 by long term missionary, Suzy McCall as a training school for Hondurans called to world mission. Today, LAMB also operates an elementary school with over 250 children, a large youth outreach ministry, and a community assistance program which ministers to the needy with food, medical care, construction help, microfinance assistance. These three ministries are centered in one of the most violent and poverty stricken areas of Tegucigalpa – Flor de Campo. LAMB also operates a residential home and school for over 60 abused and neglected children in a rural setting outside the city. LAMB’s newest ministry is an outreach and shelter for girls and young women who have been victims of human trafficking.


Please bring a dish, a friend and  join us.  You will be inspired!  For more about LAMB, check out their website at    The LAMB Institute

Sunday, July 4, 2010

Happy Independence Day!!


Here is a wonderful excerpt from a 1775 letter...
I received by the Deacon two letters from you, this day, from Hartford. I feel a recruit of spirits upon the reception of them, and the comfortable news which they contain.

We had not heard any thing from North Carolina before, and could not help feel ing anxious, lest we should find a defection there, arising more from their ancient feuds and animosities, than from any settled ill-will in the present con test ; but the confirmation of the choice of their delegates by their Assembly, leaves not a doubt of their firmness ; nor doth the eye say unto the hand, " I have no need of thee." The Lord will not cast off his people, neither will he forsake his inheritance.

Great events are most certainly in the womb of futurity ; and, if the present chastisements which we experience have a proper influence upon our conduct, the event will certainly be in our favor.

The distresses of the inhabitants of Boston are beyond the power of language to describe ; there are but very few who are permitted to come out in a day ; they delay giving passes, make them wait from hour to hour, and their counsels are not two hours together alike. One day, they shall come out with their effects ; the next day, merchandise is not effects. One day, their house hold furniture is to come out ; the next, only wearing apparel ; the next, Pharaoh's heart is hardened, and he refuseth to hearken to them, and will not let the people go. May their deliverance be wrought out for them, as it was for the children of Israel. I do not mean by miracles, but by the interposition of Heaven in their favor..... 

--A letter from Abigail Adams (1744-1818) to John Adams (1735-1826) 7 May 1775

Sunday, April 18, 2010

Still Celebrating Easter

Dear Friends, the Brick Church service was wonderful this year. It seems as if every year I say, "This one was the best EVER." Perfect weather, a great sermon, beautiful music, yummy picnic, but best of all our wonderful extended family. If you did not attend, put it on your calendar for 2011 - April 30th.

Easter is a season of 50 days but it is worth celebrating every day because an empty tomb changes everything.

Here is a terrific video which makes the case far better than I can...be sure to watch it all the way to the end. Be sure to click on the "Full Screen" icon (to the far right on the bottom frame with four arrows)- otherwise you won't be able to read the words which, for this video, is important to be able to do.

Happy Easter forever!!!

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Brick Church Sunday is This Coming Sunday - April 11th


Plan to join us for our continuing celebration of the Resurrection of Our Lord Jesus Christ!

Our preacher will be the Rev. Brian K. McGreevy (see bio below)...Brian is a thoughtful and engaging preacher...
Special music offered by  SJS Church Musician Sue Tanner - hammered dulcimer and vocals accompanied by Brink Norton, vocalist..
Our usual wonderful picnic...

The Rev. Brian K. McGreevy, J.D., serves as Head Chaplain at Porter-Gaud School, where he is also Chair of the Religion Department. He is also on the clergy staff at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church. Rev. McGreevy, an alumnus of Porter-Gaud, attended Duke University and holds a B.A. with high honors from Furman University and a J.D. from Emory University School of Law with Honors in Family Law, where he did work in the law and theology program. He has over twenty-five years’ experience with youth ministry and teaching high school and college students in several Episcopal churches, having served as College Minister at the Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta as well as having served on associate staff with InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. He has completed the three-year training program for vocational deacons administered by the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. Following a successful 15-year career in international law and management, Rev. McGreevy and his family returned to Charleston, where they owned a bed and breakfast for ten years. Rev. McGreevy is part of the senior administration at Porter-Gaud, teaches courses on New Testament and C.S. Lewis, and oversees a vibrant student ministry where nearly 100 Upper School and 60 Middle School students are involved in voluntary weekly Bible studies and discipleship groups. He is married to the former Jane Hollis Whitney, and they have four children—Whit (a sophomore at Furman University), Amy (a senior at Porter-Gaud), Mary Hollis (a freshman at Porter-Gaud), and Anne (10 years old and home-schooled).

Photo by Brenda Kay

Wednesday, April 7, 2010

A Blessed Easter to You All!

It has been said that most preachers really have only one or two sermons irregardless of how often he or she might preach.

The late Rev. Canon Samuel Fleming's was "Jesus is Lord." St. John the Beloved was known to have wearied his congregations by constantly preaching on "Love One Another." If I were to attempt to articulate my "one" Easter sermon, it would have to be drawn from these two texts: "even when we were dead through our trespasses, God made us alive together with Christ ..." (Eph. 2:5) and "Death is swallowed up in victory." (1 Cor. 15:54c).

Few poets have written more beautifully on this topic than John Donne. Here is an excerpt from his Sonnet X, read so well by actor, Emma Thompson from the film "Wit".

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Holy Week 2010

Such a beautiful song and just right for Holy Week....

"How Deep the Father's Love for Us" - Stuart Townend

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

A Lenten Message From Bishop Lawrence


February 16, 2010

Self-Examination: Spiritual Stocktaking


Dear Friends in Christ,If you have never lived in snow country where the roads are salted because of snow and ice, you may not know how salt can corrode the fenders and undergirding of your car. I remember seeing, one morning as I drove to work, an oncoming car lose its rear wheels and chassis. The trunk of the car hit the asphalt with sparks and scraping, while the rear axle and wheels went rolling off the road and into a vacant field. Since no one was hurt, I couldn’t help snickering to myself at the jocular scene, when I was suddenly arrested by the sobering thought: “Mark, when was the last time you examined the frame of your car?” Most of us, before we go on a cross-country trip, will check the oil, tires, brakes, and fill the gas tank. Yet surprisingly enough, many of us on the great journey of the Christian life, traveling over rough roads, in bad weather, icy passes and lonely barren deserts, demonstrate an all too lackadaisical attitude to the equipment of our spiritual lives.Lent is a good season to do what Evelyn Underhill calls spiritual stocktaking. In the disciplines of the Christian life this is called “Self-Examination.” It is the first discipline mentioned in the Ash Wednesday invitation to a Holy Lent. The Prayer Book reads: “I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting, and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s Holy Word.” (BCP, p. 265)Although Self-Examination, or “the examination of conscience” as it used to be called, is a long honored discipline of the Christian life, too often the average Christian not only doesn’t know how to do it, he doesn’t even know what it is. This of course is not his fault; it is the fault of us who are pastors and teachers in the Church. Ironically, 12 Step groups like A.A. and N.A. make important use of this discipline. The Fourth Step of A.A. reads: “Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.” The Fifth Step follows up: “Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.” Sixth Step: “ Were entirely ready to have God remove these defects of character.”These steps are part of the process of self-examination and repentance. As St. Paul counsels in 2 Corinthians 13:5, “Examine yourselves....” There are two fundamental sources of help for practicing self-examination. The first and most important help, which seems almost superfluous to mention, is the Holy Spirit. The Spirit indwells us as believers. The Holy Spirit knows us thoroughly and searches the deep things of our lives. (Read for instance such passages as Psalm 139, John 7:37-39, John 14:16-26, Romans 8:26-27). To invite Him to search your heart is an invitation not merely to compile a list of sins to be gotten through; it is an opportunity for growth, learning, discovery, making new connections, receiving insight and to seek His help in putting things in order. The second help for self-examination is a written list to be worked through with self-honesty. Some people use the Seven Deadly Sins--(Pride, Envy/Jealousy, Anger, Sloth/Melancholy, Greed, Gluttony and Lust), others, the Ten Commandments, or the Litany of Penitence in the Ash Wednesday Liturgy (BCP, p. 267). One possibility that is often forgotten is to use not those lists that accentuate the negative dimensions of our lives but to ask the question about the place and pursuit of virtue. After all we have spent, as a culture and Church, far too much time with the clarification of values and given too little attention to the cultivation of virtue. So to take the Beatitudes, or the Fruit of the Spirit listed in Galatians 5:19-26, or even Seven Saving Virtues (Justice, Courage/Fortitude, Prudence/Wisdom, Temperance, Faith, Hope and Love) as the focus, after scrutinizing our sins of omission, can be a profitable exercise indeed. Such written forms might nudge us into areas we might be unconsciously avoiding and yet towards that which God would have us go. Self-Examination of course is not a one-time thing; something done merely before the Ash Wednesday Liturgy. You might want to do it periodically during Lent. Find a quiet place where you’ll be alone and uninterrupted. Put aside the cell phone and computer. Allow twenty to thirty minutes. Bring along a pencil and paper. Once there ask God’s Spirit to help you in your search. It may lead you to repentance, which is of course not only the result of grace but the key which unlocks the wondrous treasures of grace.
With joyful embrace of the Lenten disciplines,I remain faithfully yours,

+Mark Lawrence
South Carolina